Monuments

Kubatur Inscriptions

Inscriptions – Inscriptions found in Kubatur and nearby areas are published in Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII. These inscriptions are provided below.

  1. On a stone near the arali-katte – No 246 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated about 950 CE – refers to the Rashtakuta king Krishna III referred as maharajadhiraja, parama-bhatttaraka, parameshvara Akalavarsha and said to be ruling on Karnataka region. Rest is much effaced.
  2. On a stone in front of Ramesvara Temple – No 248 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated about 950 CE – a certain Bidiyamma gave to the brahmans of Kuppatur gold for a thousand cows, and accepting the benediction which the thousand bestowed, setup this stone.
  3. On a stone in front of Ramesvara Temple – No 249 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1065 CE – refers to the reign of the Kalyana (Western) Chalukya king Someshvara I referred in the inscription as Trailokyamalla – Maleya king is said to be dwelling at the feet of the Chalukya king. The Maleya king is said to be ruling Banavasi-12000 and Santalige-1000. Kuppatur is said to be an immemorial agrahara ever filled with brahmans versed in vedas and shashtras. For the decoration and illumination to the Mulasthana god, Lokanatha made some grants.
  4. On the southern entrance of the rangamandapa of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 276 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1070 CE – refers to the reign of the Kalyana (Chalukya) king Someshvara II who is referred as Bhuvaikamalladeva in the inscription – After the mention of Jambu-dvipa, Mandara mountain and Bharata-varsha, Nagarakhanda country comes the mention of Kuppatur. It is told that in the krita-yuga, Banasura having discovered Kotishavra, set up in due form and with devotion, Ananta Kotishvara. Viswakarma built this temple with complete devotion, adorned with all manner of pictures, its front brilliant with many golden kalasas decked with precious stones, its towers kissing the clouds. Its priest was rajaguru Sarveshvara-shakti-deva, who is titles as Ekkoti-samaya-chakravarti and priest of seventy-seven temples. The great-minister under the king Someshvara, was Udayaditya and he was ruling over Banavasi-nad. Hearing the glories of Ananta Kotinatha, king Someshvara made grants for decorations, illuminations, vessels, cloths, great ceremonies, and ornamental buildings. An additional inscription follows the parent. This additional inscription is dated 1180 CE and refers to the reign of the Kadamba king Kama who was in Gutti at that time. Sovi-deva dandadhisvara repaired the temple of his family god and setup a golden kalasa washing the feet of Sarveshvara-shakti-deva. Further grants were made by maha-mandaleshvara Boppa-devarasa when he was in Mulugunda and maha-mandaleshvara Ishvara-deva residing at Koppale as his residence. There is another inscription following this one and dated 1215 CE. This refers to the Seuna (Yadava) king Simhana II rule. A dweller at his feet was Ahira-Jaita residing at Hiriya Balligave and protecting Jiddulige. Ahira Jaita granted his own village to god Kotinatha. Potara-nayaka, residing at Tiluvalli and protecting Nagarakhanda also made grants. Maha-mandaleshvara Dronapala also made some grants. Various other people also made grants to god Kotinatha.
  5. On a third stone near the Jain Basti – No 262 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1077 CE – The inscription starts with praises of Jain shashana. Then it refers to the Kadamba king Kirtti-deva who genealogy is given. He is said to be a direct descendant to Mayurvarmma otherwise known as Trilochana, the progenitor of the Kadamba kula. Malala-devi was the senior queen of Kirtti-deva. In the Banavasi-nad was situated Kuppatur whose thousand brahmans were distinguished for their learning and devotion. Of those connected with Bandanike, this Brahma-Jinalaya as ornament to the world, in Kuppatur, being the foremost, the acme of virtue Malala-devi obtained for it from the king Kirtti-deva, the most beautiful place in Ede-nad. Then comes the description of spiritual descent of the priests of Bandanika tirtha, starting with Kasyapa. In this Kasyapa gotra were Guatama-muni, Vishnu-muni and Bhadrabahu-yati. After him came Kunda-kundacharya and after him was the present priest Padmanandi-Siddhanta-Deva belonging to Mula-Sangha, Kranur-gana and Tintrinika-gachcha. In presence of Padmanandi-Siddhanta-deva, the crowned queen Malala-devi consecrated the Kuppatur Parshva-Deva-Chaityalaya and named it as Brahma-Jinalaya along with the priests of Kotisvara-mulasthana and all the eighteen temples here and causing the priest of Banavasi Madhukeshvara to come, performing worship here, she washed the feet of her guru.
  6. On a virakal near the Alkemma temple on the tank-bund – No 252 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1143 CE – refers to the rule of the Kalyana (Western) Chalukya king Jagadhekamalla II – It is told that a fight arose between the agrahara of Kuppatur and Nerilige on the boundaries. Bichana’s son Kirttiyanna of Kuppatur, losing control, attacked the opposite party and slayed many in the Balara plain gained the world of gods.
  7. On a second virakal near the Alkemma temple on the tank-bund – No 253 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1141 CE – refers to the reign of the Kalyana (Western) Chalukya king Jagadhekamalla II – It is told that in a dispute on the boundaries, Sangadi Madi-setti, son of Kuppatur, attacking the bond-servants of Neralige, killed many and gained the world of gods.
  8. On a virakal near Kalasavalli Dyava’s backyard – No 255 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated to the second regnal year of the Kalachuri king Bijjala II, corresponding 1158 CE – When maha-mandaleshvara Haive Boppa-deva and Chaharasa-Bammarasa were fighting with each other in the plain of Kuppatur, the bond servant Nambiya-Kesiga killed many and gained the world of gods.
  9. On a stone near the northern door of the rangamandapa of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 277 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1165 CE – refers to the reign of the Kalyana (Chalukya) Tailapa III – The sasana of Abbalur Grameshvara. Kalyana Chalukya genealogy is given starting from Taila and following his son Satysraya, latter’s younger brother Dasavarmma, his son Jayasimha, his son Ahvamalla, his son Bhuvaikamalla, his younger brother Paramardi and his son Somesvara and his son Jagadekamalla. After him his younger brother Nurmmadi Tailapa was ruling the kingdom. Maha-mandaleshvara, the boon lord of Kalanjara-pura, a lotus to the Kalachuri-kula, Bijjala. Kalidasa-chamupati was the great minister of Bijjana and Madeva-dandeshavar was Kalidasa’s son was ruling Banavasi. When he was in Balipura, he made few grants.
  10. On a virakal in the garden of Nadiga Govinda-rayar – No 251 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated in the tenth regnal year of Kalachuri king Sovi-deva, corresponding 1177 CE – Vikramanka is said to be ruling Banavasi-nad. Reference is made of besiege of the town of Kuppatur in the hands of Gavudasami with help of the raiders of Hadu-deva of Uchchangi. At this juncture, Idukeya-nayaka’s son, the brave Keteya-nayaka, slayed many and recovered women and cows and gained the world of gods.
  11. On a virakal near the Hanumanta temple – No 256 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated in ninth regnal year of the Seuna (Yadava) king Simhana II, corresponding 1218 CE – It was told that in the immemorial agrahara Kuppatur, Bijjala’s officer Jagadeva-sahani unjustly put Bomma to death and seized and arrested brahmans. The dear son of the thousand, the herdsman Dosa, killed many and released the prisoners and gained the world of gods. It further states that he broke the Turaku force, which came with loud shouts.
  12. On a slab on the raised ground near the southern entrance of the rangamandapa of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 275 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1231 CE – refers to the reign of the Seuna king Simhana II – With its splendid temples, its golden towers, its lofty mentions, its streets of shops, its interior surrounded with moat and the houses of dancing girls, how beautiful to the eyes was Kuppatur. It surpassed Alkapura, Amaravati and Bhogavati. Within that village, vying with Kailasa, stood the temple of Kotinatha, built by Vishwakarma, and carved with complete devotion, planned in perfect accordance with the many rules of architecture, and freely decorated with dravida, bhumija and nagara. Its priest was Rudra-shakti-deva. His younger brother was Sarveshvara-shakti-deva. The king, after hearing the greatness of Ananta-Kotinatha, directed Vasugi-nayaka to adorn Kotinatha with the village of Tadasa of Kaginele in Basur-nad. Many other eminent people also made grants. Siddanatha temple of Kabbina-Sirivur was also attached to the temple of Kotinatha and also the temple of stone svayambhu of Mulugunda, Ramanatha temple of Emmanur, Ramanatha temple of Kiruvade, Grameshvara temple of Abbalur, Mulasthana Vosavanteshvara temple of Tiluvalli, Chaitapura of Devangeri, Mulasthana of Hanungal and Rameshvara temple of Kuppatur were all attached to Kotinatha temple.
  13. On a virakal in the yard of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 269 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1235 CE – refers to the reign of the Seuna (Yadava) king Simhana II – when mahamandaleshvara Nigalanka-malla Bandanike Soyi-Devarasa, being in Ukkhadi, fought with people of Santalige, Ma…ya-Basava fought with many and gained the world of gods.
  14. On a virakal in front of Ramesvara Temple – No 250 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated in the twenty-sixth regnal year of the Seuna (Yadava) king Simhana II, corresponding 1237 CE – The cows of the immemorial agrahara, Kuppatur, were carried off in a raid by Sovi-deva of Gutti, at this juncture, the dear son of Hommi-setti & Kameya’s son Mara, these both ran and attacked the enemies and recovered the cows in turn giving their lives.
  15. On a second pillar at the east door of the rangamandapa of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 272 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1241 CE – The first part of the inscription is same as that of no 270. It further mentions that Vikkama-deva made some further grants after washing the feet of the priest of the Kotishvara temple, Rudra-shakti, the son of Sarbbeshvara-deva.
  16. On the east of the second pillar at the east door of the rangamandapa of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 273 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1241 CE – the Savanta Sandhana-sihva Vikka-deva made some grants for offerings to the god.
  17. On a pillar in the rangamandapa of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 274 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1245 CE – the hunter Naga-deva set up this Nandi for god Kotinatha.
  18. On a pillar in the rangamandapa of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 268 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII  – dated about 1245 CE – Promoters of vira-Bananju-dharmma, the five hundred swamis of Ayyavale, when consecrating priests of the seventy-seven crores of ghatika-sthana, granted to the Kotishavar raja-guru, Mahavadi Rudra-shakti-deva, for the decorations and illumination of the god Kotishvara.
  19. On a second pillar to the right of the east door of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 270 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1249 CE – Mention is made of the good country of Vana-kheda. In it was situated Denagave, where lived Some-deva-Vane. His son was Ravi-deva-Vane. He held the title of Sandani-simha and was a disciple of Sabbeshvara-deva. His crown-queen was Mallubayi. Their son was Soyi-deva who attained the world of gods. Soyi-deva’s younger brother was Ekkama-deva and latter’s younger one was Vikrama-deva. Rudra-sakti, praised by king Simhana, was said to be a crest-jewel of the Kalamukhas. On the specified date, Vikrama-deva, in the presence of the god Kotishvara, together with his wife Ellaha-devi, gave to hands of rajaguru mahavadi Ekkoti-chakra-vartti Rudrashakti-deva, in the presence of Sarbbeshvara-deva, money for certain lands for the merit to his father, mother and brothers.
  20. On the east side of the second pillar to the right of the east door of Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 271 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1249 CE – the chatra established by Sandhana-sihva Vikka-deva-Vane.
  21. On a pillar in the ranga-mandapa of Ramesvara Temple – No 247 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated in the nineteenth regnal year of the Seuna (Yadava) king Ramachandra, corresponding 1288 CE – refers to reign of the Yadava-Narayana, bujabala-praudha-pratapa-chakravarti vira-Rama-Deva. All the brahmans of the village Kuppatur, donated one kula of paddy per family, for the offerings to the mulasthana god of their village.
  22. On a fourth stone near the Jain Basti – No 263 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated in Chitrabhanu year which falls in either 1342 or 1402 CE – Praises to Jain shashana. Mention of Kuppatur protected by Gopesa. It is said that like the forehead ornament to the wife of king Harihara, was Jain chaityalaya which received a shashana from the Kadambas. The priest of this temple was the famous Chandraprabha. On the specified date, he fell ill and attained the world of gods taking merit to his wife and son Perggama.
  23. On a virakal near the Jain basti – No 260 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1367 CE – Shrutamani’s disciple, Devachandra-munipa, attained the world of gods. Devachandra-munipa is said to be an ornament of the family of yatis, of Desi-gana, and guru of Adi-deva. He restored a ruined Jain temple and established Jain shashana.
  24. On a broken stone near the Jain Basti – No 264 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1393 CE – much effaced, it mentions that alva-mahaprabhu Kuppatur Gopa-gauda went to heaven.
  25. On a stone to the north-west of the Jain basti – No 261 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1408 CE – refers to the reign of the Vijayanagara king Deva Raya I – Deva-Raya is told to be the son of Harihara. Praises to lord Shantinatha, master of Bhandhavapura, worshipped by Swami and other Chakris of the line of the great lord Gopisha. Ruler of Kuppatur was Gopipati, son of Sripati and grandson of Gopipati. On instructions of his guru, Siddhanti-deva, Gopipati endowed a Jain temple. The Jain guru Siddhantacharya is said to be belonging to the Mula-sangha and Desi-gana. Gopipati’s wives were Gopayi and Padmayi. After enjoying the society of his wives for many days, abandoning family pleasures, making gifts to brahmanas and discarding all pleasures of mind and palate, Gopipati went to heaven with great joy. Witnessing this, the wives of Gopipati also followed their husband on the path of salvation and attained the world of gods.
  26. On a virakal near the pond of a matt – No 258 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – – dated 1470 CE – Korana Haripa’s son killed a big tiger who came into Kegadi wood in front of the town. On rejoicing the thousand gave him name Ripu-Mari.
  27. On a second virakal near the pond of a matt – No 259 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1475 CE – desiring the rank of god, Tammuga, the son of Katigavalli Kala-gavuda, striking off heads of the hostile kings, went to the presence of Shiva and united with his wife.
  28. On a beam in the Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 278 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1518 CE – refers to the reign of the Vijayanagara king Krishna Deva Raya – When the villages granted to god Kotinatha were ruined, the king in the presence of Virupaksha-linga on the bank of Tungabhadra river, granted five villages to god Kotinatha.
  29. On another beam in the Kaitabhesvara Temple – No 279 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1518 (?) CE – Hemana-bhatta, son of Siddhara Narana Bhatta, of upamanyu-gotra and Katha-sakhe, with the countenance of Deva-nayaka, obtained the hands of Krishna-raya the villages for the god Kotinatha and returned.
  30. On a copper plate found in Kubatur – No 265 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1527 CE (?) – refers to the Vijayanagara king Achyuta-Raya Narasimha-Raya Krishna-Raya – obeisance to god Uma-Kaitabheshvara. The king is told to be seated on the throne in Vidyanagara and a servant to the lotus feet of the universal emperor of the sixty-eight great lingas, the god Virupaksha whose lotus throne is at the Pampa-kshetra on the bank of Tungabhadra. A dweller at the feet of the king, the headman of Pithamane village, the first in Kuppatur-26 of the Nagarakhanda Malu-nad, belonging to the Chandragutti-venthe of Banavasi-12000, was Sankanna. Then comes the various preferences and offerings allowed to Sankanna when he is in this village.
  31. An another copper plate from Kubatur – No 266 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated 1629 CE (?) – on the date specified, Keladi Venkatapa-Nayaka favored to the worthy Basavalingappa’s son Basavaya’s son Bhadrapa an original order for the gaudike of the kasabe Kupatur in the Kupatur-sime. Details of the order follow.
  32. No 267 of Sorab Taluq of Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII – dated about 1629 CE – This is a similar grant as of no. 266 also made by Keladi Venkatapa-nayaka. It is too much effaced to find the meaning.

References:

  1. Rao, Hayavadana C (1930). Mysore Gazetteer. The Government Press. Bangalore.
  2. Rice, B L (1879). Mysore Inscriptions. Mysore Government Press. Bangalore.
  3. Epigraphia Carnatica vol VIII.
  4. Annual Report of the Mysore Archaeological Department for the year 1911. Government Branch Press. Mysore.
  5. Annual Report of the Mysore Archaeological Department for year 1941. Government Branch Press. Mysore.