Between 1001 and 1500 CE, Karnataka, Suenas

Tilavalli – Santeshvar Temple

Introduction – Tilivalli is a small village in Hangul taluk of Haveri district of Karnataka. In 2001, the population of the village stood at 6629 which grew to 7218 in 2011 census.

Inscriptions – J Burgess counted 16 inscriptions at the village. Dharwad gazetteer mentions twenty-six inscriptions here. Only 16 inscriptions were published in the Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46.

  1. Slab on the roadside, outside the Kalyana-matha  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 250 – refers to the rule of the Western Chalukya king Bhuvanaikamalladeva (Somesvara II) – dated Saka 993, corresponding 1072 CE – Registers a grant by the Bantas, at the command of the thousand of agrahara Tilivalli, for the stone embankment of the great tank. Also registers some gift of land in Kuppatura-thane by Nagavarmayya and others at the command of perggade-dandanayaka Charoja of Yelavatti; and similar gift by Malappayya and others in Tilivalli-thane at the command of Madiraja, the perggade of Banavase-12,000.
  2. A slab in the place called Dyamavvana Padagatti – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 262 – refers to the rule of Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalladeva (Vikramaditya VI) – dated Chalukya vikrama year 6, corresponding 1081 CE – Records the remission of certain taxes to the god Sankara-narayana of the agrahara Tilivalli by perggade Parasuramayya, senabova Chandimayya, Rajadhyaksha Gangapayya and others, while Mahasamantadhipati Mahaprachanda-danda-nayaka Sridharabhatta was in charge of the Vaddaravula-sunka of Elvatti and Perjjunka of Belvala-nad and Banavase-nad.
  3. Another slab behind the Kalyana- matha  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 249 – refers to the rule of the Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalladeva (Vikramaditya VI) – dated in Chalukya Vikrama year 44, corresponding 1119 CE – Registers grants by Rudrabhattopadhyaya and his wife Machiyabbe for the kaivalya of Maleyabhattopadhyaya in the presence of the Thousand of the agrahara Tilivalli. Also states that dandanayaka Vishnudevarasa made a gift of oil for the perpetual lamp of the god Malesvaradeva.
  4. Slab outside the house of Vaze Master  – no 252 – refers to the rule of Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalladeva (Vikramaditya VI, 1076-1126 CE) – date lost – Badly damaged ; the right portion of the stone is broken away and lost.
  5. A hero-stone in the place called Dyamavvana Padagatti  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 261 – dated Chalukya vikrama year 51, corresponding 1126 CE – Records the death of Bamma of Mosale in the cattle-raid of Tilivalli.
  6. Slab behind the Kalyana- matha  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 248 – refers to the rule of the Western Chalukya king Bhulokamalladeva (Somesvara III) – dated in 3rd regnal year, corresponding 1128 CE – Registers a grant of land by Devadasabhattyya, son of Vasudevayya, son of Devadasabhattopadhyaya of Kaundilya-gotra, for a satra after the padapuje of the Thousand. Also records another grant by Kesavadeva, his younger brother and several others. States that Tailapa was governing the whole of Banavasi-desa from the capital Hanungal.
  7. Slab outside the place called Dyamavvana Padagatti  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 258 – refers to the rule of the Western Chalukya king Bhulokamalla (Somesvara III) – dated in his 5th regnal year, corresponding 1130 CE – Registers a gift of land by Singana of Sudi, son of the Thousand of the agrahara, for the offerings, etc. of the god Banteshvara.
  8. Slab lying in the Kalyana- matha  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 247 – refers to the rule of the Western Chalukya king Bhulokamalladeva (Somesvara III) – dated in chalukya Vikrama year 55, corresponding 1130 CE – Registers certain gifts of land by Govindimeyya, son of Kali-mojha, for the worship of god Janardanaeva of the temple of Vasudevopadhyaya, son of Padmanabha-bhatta, of Manale, and one of the thousand of the agrahara Tilivalli. It also states that Kalimojha was the grandson of Vasudevopadhyaya.
  9. Slab near the Churchi-matha  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 251 – refers to the rule of Western Chalukya king Nurmadi Trailokyamalladeva (Tailapa III, 1151-1164 CE) – Damaged. Worn out and the right portion broken away and lost.
  10. Slab outside the place called Dyamavvana Padagatti – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no  259 – refers to the rule of Western Chalukya king Trailokyamalla – dated in his 5th regnal year, corresponding 1156 CE – Records a gift of land to the same god by Konekara Baichana given to the Thousand.
  11. Hero-stone in the compound of the Santeshvara temple – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 255 – refers to the rule of the Suena king Singhana I – dated in his 29th regnal year, corresponding 1160 CE – Incomplete. Seems to record the death of a hero (name lost), the senanayaka of Sovideva of Aguri, in a fight. The author of the inscription probably take the king as Singhana I instead of Singhana II though both ruled for more than 30 years. If he is taken as Singhana I then with latest refined dates for his rule, the inscription would be dated 1145 CE, and if he is taken as Singhana II then the date of the inscription would be 1229 CE.
  12. Slab in the compound of the Santeshvara temple – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 257 – refers to the rule of the Suena king Singhana II – dated Saka 1160, corresponding 1237 CE – Gives the genealogy of the king and narrates his exploits. Registers the gift of the village Sudangi and some other gifts made by the king’s subordinate savanta Kalideva for the worship, repairs, etc. of the temple of Savanteshvara built by him in memory of his father Savanta Thakkura. The gift was made to the Thousand mahajanas of Tilivalli. Savanta Kalideva’s genealogy is given, and his brother Rannugi is mentioned. Also describes the Shaiva teachers of the Kalamukha sect.
  13. A nishidhi stone in the house of Khandekar  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 253 – Records the death by samadhi of Pujari Pevayya.
  14. On a pillar in the Santeshvara temple – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 256 – Records that Sulipalladeva caused to be set up the god Basavesvara.
  15. Hero-stone in the place called Dyamavvana Padagatti – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 260 – Records the death of Boppa, brother of Devisetti and son of Ketavi of [Belu]vatti. Also states that the (sculpture) stone (of the hero) was presented by the Mahajanas of agrahara Tilivalli and set up by the (Banta) Thousand in the temple of Bammeshvara.
  16. Slab outside the house of Ganesobhatta  – Annual Report on Indian Epigraphy for 1945-46, no 254 – dated Saka 1679, corresponding 1757 CE – Registers a grant made by the Government to Rangabhata, son of Narayanabhata.

Monuments – There are few modern temples, but only Santeshvar temple is of interest.

Santeshvar Temple

North-east View

Santeshvar Temple – This east facing temple is consisted of a mandapa, antarala and a garbha-grha. The temple is 75 feet long and 57 feet wide. The mandapa is supported on 44 pillars, and provided with three entrance, one each at east, north and south.

Mandapa

Indra

Central ceiling of the mandapa has ashta-dikpalas on its offsets. Antrala doorway is provided with perforated panels on either sides. Door-jambs are plain and devoid of any sculptures. There are niches provided on either side of the doorway and as well of the side walls, north and south. Southern niche has Sapta-matrikas, western left niche has a modern veena player sculpture. Right western niche has Mahishasura-mardini while the northern niche has some modern sculptures.

Amorous Couples

As per an inscription, the temple was constructed by savanta Kalideva, a subordinate of the Suena king Singhana II, in memory of his father in 1237 CE. The temple was referred as Savanteshvara and the priests were from Kalamukha lineage.

 

How to Reach – Tilavalli is located 24 km from Hangal and 35 km from Haveri. It is located on state highway 76. Haveri is the nearest railway head.

References

  1. Burgess, James (1885). List of Antiquarian Remains in the Bombay Presidency. Government Central Press. Mumbai.
  2. Cousens, Henry (1926).The Chalukyan Architecture of the Kanarese Districts. Archaeological Survey of India. New Delhi.
  3. Palande, M R (1959). Dharwad District Gazetteer. Karnataka Government Press.