Monuments

Haveri – Inscriptions

Inscriptions – Dharwad gazetteer reports thirty-two inscriptions found at Haveri. Twenty-eight of these inscriptions are published in South Indian Inscriptions vol XVIII.

  1. Stone set up on the tank bund – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 30 – refers to the reign of the Rashtrakuta king Krishna III (939-967 CE) – date lost – This mutilated inscription refers itself to the reign of Kannaradeva.  The details of the date preserved are Ashtami, Sunday.  It records the death of a hero (name lost) of Haveri in cattle-raid, when Kalivitta was governing Banavasi-de[sa].  Senemallara-Mallpa is stated to have been holding the office of nalgamundu at that time.  The characters are of the 10th century A.D.  It may be noted that Kalivitta referred to above figures in other records of Krishna III as the governor of Banavasi.  He belonged to the Chellaketana family.  On these grounds the record may be assigned to the reign of Krishna III.
  2. Slab at Siddheshvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 108 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Vikramaditya VI – 1109 CE – This inscription mentions a gift of tolls on betel leaves made by Nimbarasa along with the Gatrigasa for music and dancing in the temple of Siddhesvaradeva (at Haveri).  The gift was made in the presence of the Four-hundred Mahajanas of Haveri, who are highly praised in the record.  A eulogistic account is also given of Nimbarasa and his father Dandayanaka Madhava-bhatta who was in charge of the panaya (tax). Mahapradhana, Bhanasavergade, Dandanayaka Anantapa is stated to be governing Banavasi-12000 and to be in charge of vaddaravula and pannaya taxes. The record is stated to have been composed are written (on stone) by Naranadeva of Visvamitra-gotra.
  3. Two pieces of a slab in the Kallumandapa – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 136 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king  Sarvajna-chakravarti Bhuloka-mallade[va] (Somesvara III) – dated in eighth regmal year, corresponding 1134 CE – The record, which gives a glowing account of the agrahara Pavari, the tank situated therein and the Mahajanas of that place, seems to state that the village was made into an agrahara, during the reign of Ahavamalla.  It further states that, at the request of Mahapradhana, Senadhipati, Manevergade and Piriya-Dandanayaka Kumara-Padmanabharas, the governor of Banavasi, to repair the tank and revive its grant which had lapsed, Mallikarjuna of the Kadamba family got it repaired, after worshipping the four-hundred Mahajanas. The donor is stated to be governing Sattalige-1000, Pannungal-500 and other divisions.  An earlier grant made in Saka 989, seems to be mentioned in lines 18-19. The record is badly damaged.  It is stated to have been composed by Kiriya Mukana-Pandita.
  4. Slab in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 142 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Somesvara III (1126-1138 CE)  – Date lost – This inscription, the latter portion of which is badly damaged, refers itself to the reign of Sarvajna-chakravarti Bhulokamalladeva and records a certain grant probably made to the god Siddesvaradeva.  The details of the grant are lost. Pergade Nagadeva and Duggaraja are stated to be in charge of the perjunka, vaddaravula and bilkode taxes, under Tailapa of the Kadamba family who was governing Vanavase-12000, and Satalige-1000, and Panumgal-500.  Nagadeva is called the mahamatya of Tailapa.
  5. Broken slab in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 155 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Jagadekamalla II (1138-1151 CE) – Date lost – This inscription, which gives the origin and genealogy of the Chalukya kings, is broken off after the description of Pratapachakravarti Jagadekamalla.  It may be noted hat it is one of the few stone inscriptions which gives the origin of the Later Chalukya family.
  6. Slab in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 157 – refers to the the reign of the Western Chalukya king Trailokymalladeva(Taila III) – dated in third regnal year, corresponding 1152 CE – It records a grant of certain taxes to god Siddhesvaradeva of the agrahara town Haveri by Savasi Mayideva, jointly with five-hundred Banajigas.  Mayideva was in charge of the hejjunka and unddaravula taxes.  The grant was made in the presence of the four-hundred mahajanas of Haveri.  Dandanayaka Mahadevarasa is stated to be governing Huligere-300 and Banavase-12000. A supplementary grant of money and taxes made by Machideva of the Jimutavahana lineae and Khachara family, the nargavunda of Basavur-140 and by Hegade Rechana and others, is also recorded.  The gift was made for the offerings and a perpetual lamp to the same god.
  7. Slab near the Kallumantapa -South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 159 – Taila III – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Trailokyamalladeva (Taila III) – dated in eighth regnal year, corresponding 1157 CE – The record begins with the genealogy of the Chalukyas.  This account, however is faulty.  Ayyana and Jayasimha II are wrongly stated to be the son and grandson of Vikramaditya V; but actually they were his brothers.  The inscription states that Heggade Rudradeva and other Karnas made a grant of money and taxes to the tank a the agrahara town Havari.  Rudradeva is stated to be a subordinate of Kesiraja who was a subordinate of Kalachurya Bijjala, who it may be noted, already bears some of the paramount titles.  The tank is stated to have been constructed by the mythical king Nala in Kritayuga.  The Mahajanas of the place are highly praised. Another grant by a Sunkaveggade (name lost) and Dandanayaka Ratnabhatta made to the tank and to the gods Siddhesvaradeva and Indresvaradeva is also recorded. At the top is engraved a grant made to the Hiriyakere tank, in the 3rd year of the reign of he Kalachurya king Bijjaladeva on Ashadha ba. Amasvasya, Sunday.  The cyclic year is lost.
  8. Slab set up in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 186 – refers to the reign of the Kalchuri king Sovideva – Undated – This badly damaged record refers to Rayamurari Somesvara and registers some gifts for the worship of god Siddhesa made by Mayiyana-Chamupati.  It mentions Siddhapayya-Dandanayaka, a subordinate of the king. A reference has also been made to Bijjana as vanquishing the enemies.
  9. In the ranga-mantapa in the Siddheshvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 196 – refers to the reign of the Hoysala king Vira-Ballala II – dated in cyclic year, corresponding 1207 CE – It records the gift of money made by Surigeya Pirumaleyanna, son of Mahapradhana, Sarvadhikari and Mahapasayta Odeyanna, the sword-bearer, for burning a perpetual lamp to god Siddhanathadeva.  The gift was entrusted to Galatigeya Mallisetti, in the presence of the devotees and the Four-hundred (Mahajanas).  A supplementary grant made for the same purpose and to the same person by Heggade Vaijayya has also been recorded.
  10. Beam in the ranga-mandapa in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 207 – dated in the eighteenth regnal year of the Yadava king Singhana II, corresponding 1218 CE – It records the gift of money made by Dechchi-setti and Mayi-setti, sons of Maili-setti of Gudiyabidu, when Mahamandalesvara Lakshmipaladeva was the governor.  The gift was entrusted to Jnanarasideva, for the worship, etc., of god Svayambhu-Siddhanatha-deva of Haveri.
  11. South wall of the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 206 – dated in ninteenth regnal year of the Yadava king Singhana II, corresponding 1219 CE – It registers a gift made by Jmamarasodeva and others to a certain Davanna. It is damaged.
  12. South beam in the rangamandapa in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 209 – dated in the eighteenth regnal year of the Yadava king Singhana II, corresponding 1218 CE – It records a grant of money made by the merchants (nakharas) of Haveri, for offerings to god Vinayakadeva (in the temple) of god Svayambhu-Siddhanathadeva.  Mahamandalesvara Lakshmipaladeva is stated to be the governor at that time.
  13. North beam of the rangamandapa in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 212 – dated in the twenty-second regnal year of the Yadava king Singhana II, corresponding 1222 CE – It registers a gift of two gadyanas made by Jayideva-Nayaka son of Ra[vu]vaneya-Nayaka, for burning a perpetual lamp to god Siddhesvara of anadiyagrahara Haveri.  Kannuva-Nayaka is stated to be the protector of the gift.
  14. Pillar in the temple of Kalamesvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 235 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Kannara – dated in the 8th regnal year, corresponding 1255 CE – It registers a gift of money and a flower-garden made by Malla-setti of Vijayapura for the worship of god Gopaladeva of Haveri.
  15. Slab to the left of Ganesa temple – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 242 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Kannara (1247-1261 CE) – Date lost – It states that Chamundaraya who was a subordinate of the king and was governing from his capital Puligere revived the grant of the agrahara town of Haveri apparently to the mahajanas of that place.  The grant is stated to have been formerly protected by the Hoysala emperor Ballala but later on it lapsed owing to the activities of unrighteous persons.  From the context it appears that the inscription records the tradition that the agrahara town of Haveri was founded by the mythical king Nala and also a tank was constructed therein by him.  It seems that the town was called Nalapuri.
  16. Nandi-pillar set upnear the temple of Virabhadra – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 248 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Mahadeva – dated saka 1186, corresponding 1265 CE – It records the grant of the village Chamgur, made by Devaraja, the Maharadhana of the king, for the worship and offerings of god Kapilasiddha-Mallikarjuna of Sonnalige (modern Sholapur).  Devaraja is stated to be governing the southern region (Dakshinam bhuvam). The record begins with a vachana in Kannada and the grant portion which is followed by another vachana, is in Sankrit.
  17. North-east pillar in the ranga-mandapa in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 249 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Mahadeva – dated saka 1187, corresponding 1266 CE – It states that Baicharasa, son of Sumkadhikari Kallarasa of Vijayapura made a grant  of toll-incomes of the sthalas of god Siddhanathadeva of the agrahara of Haveri for burning perpetual lamps to the god.  The grant was made at he instance of Samastadesdhipati Dejarada Madarasa who was the agent of Mahapradhana Devarasa of Toragale, a subordinate of the king.
  18. South-east pillar in the ranga-mandapa of the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 253 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Mahadeva – dated saka 1191, corresponding 1269 CE – It records the grant of the income derived from certain tolls to the god Svayambhu-Siddhanatha of the agrahara town Haveri by Tipparasa, the son of Dommara Naranadeva, the vrittimanta of the agrahara.  The grant was made at the instance of Samastadesadhipati Vitharasa, the agent of mahapradhana and Sarvadhikari Tipparasa.  Vitharasa is stated to be the uncle (mava), possibly of the latter.
  19. Hero-stone on the tank bund near the temple of Kalamesvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 261 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Ramachandra – dated in cyclic year, corresponding 1284 CE – It states that the stone erected in the hero-stone of the son (name not given) of Bommaya-Nayaka who is described as the son (maga) of the Four-Hundred (mahajanas).
  20. South-western pillar in the ranga-mandapa in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 270 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Ramachandra – dated in thirtieth regnal year, corresponding 1301 CE – It records a gift of certain taxes for the worship and offerings to god Siddhanathadeva of the maha-piriy-agrahara Haveri.  The grant was made by Sumkadhikari Madayya under the orders of Saluveya Acharasa.
  21. Hero-stone near the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 271 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Ramachandra (1271-1311 CE) – undated – This record states that during the reign of Ramachandra a hero (name lost) of [Belatur] died in a fight.
  22. Hero-stone near the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 273 – undated – This inscription apparently belonging to the reign of a Yadava king (name lost) states that the stone was erected in memory of Udeya-Nayaka who died in a fight with Bala-gavunda of Kelavur.
  23. Hero-stone in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 370 – in characters of 12-13th century CE – This short inscription written in characters of about the 12-13th century CE states that Masaya, son of Kshemaya-Nayaka died in a fight at Banavase on Tuesday, su. 13, in the month of Bhadrapada of the cylcic year Virodhi.
  24. North-west pillar in the ranga-mandapa in the Siddheshvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 388 – This record belonging to the 13th century CE is dated in the cyclic year and states that, at the instance of Sarvadhikari Vikadeva-pandita, Chavundarasa, the mahaianas, Nagaras, Ubhayamarga-Tuluras and other bodies, granted incomes on certain articles, for offerings to god Siddhanathadeva (of Haveri).
  25. Capitals of the pillars in the temple of Siddheshvara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 389 – These inscription state that the respective pillars on which they are engraged were caused to be made by Galatigeya Mallisetti and his three sons Karuva Simgisetti, Mukisetti and Mahadevasetti. The characters belong to about the 13th century CE.
  26. Beam in the temple of Virabhadra – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 390 – This record of about the 13th century CE states that Madarasa had the foot prints (of a deity) made in the Jina-mandira.
  27. Stone set up in the Viraktamatha – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 446 – dated saka 1681, corresponding 1759 CE – records the foundation of the Virakta-matha of Huchcha-Chanavirappa, the charamurti (disciple?) of Huchcha-basavlingasvami.
  28. Stone in the temple of Venkatesvara in the agrahara – South Indian Inscriptions, vol XVIII, no 456 – This inscription written in characters of about the 19th century CE, seems to record the installation of the (image) of god Srinivasa. The record is very indistinct and illegible.