Monuments

Lakshmeswar – Inscriptions

Inscriptions – There are more than fifty inscriptions found in and around the village.

  1. On a slab fixed in the left wall of the Sankha-basti at Basti-Bana – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 3 – refers to the Eastern (Badami) Chalukya king Ereyamma (Pulakesi II – 610–642 CE) – undated – It registers a gift of 500 nivarttanas of land to the north of Puligere-nagara, for the worship of and offerings to the God Sankha-Jinendra, by Durgasakti, son of Kundasakti and grandson of Vijayasakti, of the Sendra lineage.
  2. On a slab built into the right wall of the Sankha-basti at Basti-Banu – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 4 – refers to the Badami Chalukya king Vinayaditya – dated saka 608, corresponding 683 CE – It records the grant, by the king, of the village Hadagile situated in Beluvala-300 for the repairs, worship and offerings to the God of Sankha Jinalaya, and also for a dana-sala, at the request of Dhruvadevacharya of Mula Sangh and Deva-gana.
  3. On a slab built into the right wall of the Sankha-basti at Bati-Bana – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 5 – refers to the Badami Chalukya king Vijayaditya – dated saka 645, corresponding 723 CE – It records the gift the village of Sembolal, to the temple of Jina-Bhattaraka at Purikara-nagara by the Bikki Ranaka, at the request of a certain Vijaya, son of Dronamma.  The gift was made over to Jayadeva-panditacharya of Mula Sangh.  The gift village is said to have been situated to the south of Purikara-nagara.
  4. Slab built into the right wall of the Sankha-basti at Basti-Bana – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 6 – refers to the Badami Chalukya king Vijayaditya – dated saka 651, corresponding 730 CE – It records the gift of the village of Kaddama to the south of Paurikara-nagara for the worship of Sankha-Jinendra and for the maintenance of a dana-sala in the temple.  The gift was made by the king at the instance of his preceptor Niravadya-pandita.
  5. On a slab fixed into the left wall of the Sankha-basti at Basti-Bana  –  South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 7 – refers to the Badami Chalukya king Vikramaditya II – dated saka 656, corresponding 735 CE – It records the gift, by the king, of 50 nivarttanas of land, at the request of Bahubalisreshthi, for repairs and offerings to Dhavala-Jinalaya, and also for maintenance of a dana-sala.  The gift was entrusted to Vijayadeva-panditacharya of Mula-sangha and Deva-gana.
  6. Broken stone built into the wall of the Taluk-office – Epigraphia Indica vol VI/South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 11 – refers to the Rashtrakuta king Srivallabha (Dhruva) – undated, but is assigned to 793 CE by Dr. Fleet – It refers itself to the reign of Srivallabha and records a grant in the form of proportionate quantity of the goods turned out by the weavers.  The grant was made by the headman of the guild of the weavers of murumkeri of Purigere.
  7. Slab built into the right wall in Sankha-basti in Basti-bana – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 244 – refers to the Western Ganga king Marasimha II – dated saka 890, corresponding 968-69 CE – It registers a grant, by the king, of  the village Siggala, to Ganga-kandarpa-Jinalaya, a Jain monastery, apparently called after the king. The grant seems to have been entrusted  to Jayadeva-pandita.
  8. On a slab fixed in the left will of the Sankha-basti in Basti-bana – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 245 – refers to the reign of the Western Ganga king Marasimha II – dated saka 890, corresponding 968-69 CE – It records a grant of some lands to Ganga-kandarpa-Jinalaya, named after the King. The grant was made over to Jayadeva-pandit, a Jain priest. The genealogy of the Ganga king is given.
  9. Slab set up near the Brahmadeva temple in Basti-bana – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 246 – refers to the reign of the Western Ganga king Marasimha II – dated saka 893, corresponding 971 CE – It appears to record a grant for effecting repairs to Sankha Jinaliya and for feeding the ascetics. The grant was made by Marasimha jointly with another individual whose name is lost. The details of the grant are lost.
  10. Slab standing in front of the btradive temple at hire Bana (suburb) – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 47 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Bhuvanaikamalla (Somesvara II)— dated saka 996, corresponding 1074 CE – It records that Mahasamanta Jayakesiyarasa, son of Indrakesiyarasa of Manala family, Who was the Rashtrantaka of Purigere–300 division, visited Permadi Basadi at Purigere, made it into a pura at the request of Tribhuvanachandrapandita, disciple of Gandavimukta–Bhattaraka of mula-sangh and balatkara-gana and remitted certain tax–income to the same. Mahamandalesvara Lakshamarasa was then governing the divisions of Purigere–300 and Belvola–300.
  11. Slab built into the will of the backyard of the Taluk Office  – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 52 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Vikramaditya VI – – dated saka 969, corresponding 1077 –78 CE – This record is written in Sanskrit and Kannada languages. It records the death of Srinandi-Panditadeva of Surastra-gana by the rite of Sallekhana observed for one month at Anesejjeya-basadi at Purikaranagara. It also record the death on the second date of Bhaskaranandi-Pandita who is said to have been the elder brother of the former.
  12. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk office – Epigraphia Indica vol XVI/South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 53 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalla (Vikramaditya VI) – dated sixth Chalukya-vikrama year, corresponding 1081 CE – The inscription, which is incomplete, registers a grant made by Dona, the younger brother of Mahasamantadhipati Eremayya who was administering the Purigere-300, for the Jain cult in Purikara. The gift was entrusted to Narendrasena (II), of the Sena-gana in the Mula Sangh, the disciple of Nayasena Suri who in his turn was the disciple of Narendrasena (I). It is stated that at the time of the record the king‘s younger brother Yuvaraja (Jayasimha III) was governing the two Six–Hundreds (vis. Belvola-300 and Purigere–300), Banavasi –12000, Santalige-1000 and Kandur-1000.
  13. Slab record into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 55 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalla ( Vikramaditya VI ) – not dated, based upon tithi it corresponds to 1082 CE –  The inscription  registers a gift of land made by the five-hundred members headed by Santi-setti of Purigere, after purchasing it form the Brahmanas with the money which had accumulated with interest, granted, formerly to Talara Nagavaraman, a subordinate of Vavana-nripati, to Lakkana-setti, father of Santi-setti, For the benefit of drawing water by picotta (eat) from the well called Ratanada-bavi When Trailokyamalla Vira–Nolama-Pallava-permanadi-Jayasimhadeva was governing Purigere-300, Belvola–300, Banavasi-12000 and Kandur-1000. It refers to one Jayakeaief Sagara family as the subordinate of Jayasimha.
  14. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk Office – Epigraphia Indica vol XVI/South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 66 – refers to the king Western Chalukya king Vikramaditya VI – dated Chalukya-Vikrama year 27, corresponding 1102 CE – The inscription registers a gift of income from taxes to god Muddesvara in the Temple of Svayambhu–Somesvara at Purigere by Dandanayaka, Achchu-panayadadhi-Shthayaka Madhava-bhatta who was a subordinate of High Minister and general Bhivanayya, hailing from Kashmir, who was administering the achchu-panaya (tax) of Palasige-12000. The gift was entrusted to Mahendrasoma–pandita, the acharya of the temple .
  15. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 74 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalla (Vikramaditya VI) – dated Chalukya-Vikrama year 37, corresponding 1112 CE – The inscription records a gift, by Dandanayaka Anantamayya, for the maintenance of the quarter for dancing girls (sule-geri) constructed by him, attached to the Temple of Somesvaradeva at Purigere when his brother-in-law Sripatiyarasa was Governing the Two-600 division, viz., Belvola-300 and Purigere-300. The gift-land Was purchased from the Mahajanas of the nagara (i.e. Purigere) and the Gavundas.
  16. Slab built into the will of the backyard of the Taluk Office  – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 78 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalla (Vikramaditya VI) – dated Chalukya-Vikrama year 43, corresponding 1118 CE – The inscription records a gift of income from certain taxes to the temple of Ramesvaradeva of Rajadhani Puligere by Sadaverggade Sovarasa at the instance of Dandanayaka, Charasa who was governing Puligere-300. The gift was entrusted to Samavedi-Pandita, the Acharya of the temple. It further records other gifts by the Aivattokkalu and other individuals for the same temple.
  17. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 81 – refers to the Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalla (Vikramadiya VI ) – dated Chalukya-Vikrama year 4 [7], corresponding 1122 CE – This badly damaged record records a gift of land to god Somesvara by Dandanayaka Nagavarmmayya after purchasing  it from the 120 mahajanas of Puligere. One senapati Sovideva is mentioned.
  18. Slab set up in the backyard of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 83 – refers to the Western Chalukya king Tribhuvanamalla (Vikramaditya VI) – dated Chalukya–Vikrama year 48, corresponding 1123 CE – The inscription records a gift of land to Agastyapanditadeva, the disciple Samavedipandita  for  feeding and maintenance of the teacher who was teaching Kaumara-vyakarana and his students in the matha attached to the temple of Ramesvaradeva at Puligere, by Dandanayaka Nagavarmayya, after purchasing the Gift–land.
  19. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 99 – refers to the Western Chalukya king Bhulokamalla (Somesvara III)— dated dated Chalukya-Bhulokamalla year 53, corresponding 1128 CE – The inscription registers a gift of land for the benefit of an educational institution (ghatige) attached to the temple of Svayambhu Dakshina Somanatha at rajadhani pattana Puligere, by Mahamandalesvara Jayakesideva.
  20. Pillar in the Karibasappana-matha – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 102 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Bhulokamalla (Somesvara III) – dated in the king’s regnal year 7, corresponding 1132 CE – The inscription states the rules for constructing houses (in the temple site) Made by Indrakirti-pandita, the archarya of Mahasthana Goggiya-basadi, perggade Malliyanna,the devaputrakas and the aruvattokkalu headed by Lakkisetti. It Also records a gift of land to the pujari of the basadi by Hemadevabadya.
  21. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk Office  –  South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 107 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Bhulokamalla (Somesvara III) – dated in the king’s regnal year 13, corresponding 1138 CE – The inscription registers a gift of the kirukula taxes and the gold income due From the devabhoga of  the village Nitturu, made in favour of the god Svayabmhu Dakshina- Somanathadeva at Purikara,by Jayakesidevarasa of the Sagara family, in conjunction with the One Thousand, headed by Tantrapala Chattimayya- nayaka,to the sthanacharya Jnanasoma-panditadeva in the presence of Dandanayaka Chiddarasa, Mahadevarasa and Mahajanas of rajadhani-pattana Purigere, etc.
  22. Slab built into the wall in the backyard of the Taluk Office –  Epigraphia Indica vol XVI/South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 117 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Jagadekamalla II – dated in the king’s regnal year 10, corresponding 1147 CE – The inscription registers certain gifts of lands in Kunduravalli and Huligere Made by Dandanayaka Mecharasa when Dandanayaka Kesimayya was governing Belvola-300, Huligere–300, Halasige–12000 and Hanungal-500 and when Jayakesideva of the Manala family was the manneya of Huligere-nadu. The record was composed by Karnnatasukavi Mukhya-pandita and engraved by Chavoja, the eldest son of Jinnoja of Puligere.
  23. Slab built into the wall in the backyard of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 120 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Chalukya- Pratapachakravati (Jagadekamalla II) – Date lost – This damaged record, in characters of about the 12th century CE, refers to the Chalukya king with the title Pratapackravarti but his name is lost. He was Probably Jagadekamalladeva II who had this title. The inscription seems to record gifts of several urittis of land to the individuals mentioned as also to some temples. All details are lost.
  24. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk Office – Epigraphia Indica vol XVI – the last date is 4th regnal year of Trailokyamalla, corresponding 1153 CE – the record chronicles three endowments and was redacted in its present form on the occasion of the last of these. The first part praises Permadi-Ra[ja], by whom Vikramaditya VI to be meant, Tailapa (Ahvamalla Nurmadi Taila II), Satyasraya and Vikarama, i.e. Vikramaditya VI. IT mentions his success over Cholas, Nepalas, and Gurjaras. Then comes the grant referring to his reign. This is followed by lineage of his feudatory Kadamba Mahamandaleshvara Taila (II) or Tailaha-devarasa of Hangal. He was the son of Santa (Santivarman) and Sriya-devi. Then follows the praises for town Purikara and its sanctuary of Maha-svayambhu-Somanatha or Dakshina-Soma. Its preist Mahendrasoma-panditadeva visited Taila II at Panungallu (modern Hangal) and blessed him with Shaiva Eucharist, and in return got the town of Kallavana for the maintenance of his temple. The second part opens with praise to Chalukya Taila II who is also called Irmadi-padirmadi-nurmadi-Taila. His feudatory Kadamba prince, Mavuli-Taila, the grandson of Tailaha-deva, was reiging at Nareyangallu and was worshiper of Somanatha. His Maha-mandaleshvara Vira Pandya was the seignior of Puligere-nadu. General Mahadevarasa was governing Banavasi country and general Biddarasa and Attiraja were governing Puligere under the orders of Mahadevarasa. Prince Mavuli-Taila visited the temple and reconfirmed his grandfather’s endowment with further provisions to that. The trustee was Jnanasoma-pandita-deva. The last endowment was from Dakarasa, general in command of Hanungallu-500, for lamps in the same temple. First grant is dated 37 Chalukya-vikrama year, corresponding 1107 CE. The second grant is dated 3rd regnal year of Trailokyamalla Angiras, corresponding 1152 CE. The third grant is dated 4th regnal year of Trailokyamalla, corresponding 1153 CE.
  25. Slab set up near the Bilva tree in the Somesvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 122 – refers to the reign of the Western Chalukya king Trailokyamalla (Taila III) – dated in the king’s regnal year 2, corresponding 1153 CE – The inscription records a gift of money to the temple of savayambhu Dakshinasomanatha of rajadhani-pattana Purigere by Mahamandalesvara Vira-pandyadeva who was the hiriya-manneya of Haligere-300, Mahamandalesvara  Jayakesidevarasa and One Thousand body (parigraha) of the place for their own welfare. The gift was made over to Jananasoma-panditadeva,the acharya of the temple. Virapandyadeva is said to have belonged to Yadu-vamsa.
  26. On a pillar in the utsava hall in the Somesvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 130 – refers to the Western Chalukya king Somesvara IV – dated in the king’s regnal year 2, corresponding 1187 CE – The inscription registers a gift of oil by the Ayvattakkalu to the temple of Kattamesvaradeva and also a gift of betel-leaves and money to the temple by the Five-Hundred. The gift was made over to Aghorasaktideva.
  27. On a Slab built into the wall in the backyard of Taluk Office  – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 137 – refers to the Kalachuri king Bijjala – dated saka 1083, 1161 CE – It gives the genealogy Of  the Western Chalukya king Nurmadi Taila (i.e., Taila III). Then follows an Eulogistic account of Bijjala. It further states that while Vesuva-nayaka and four Other karanas were administering  Huligere-300, Devarrasi-pandita, the acharya of God Ramaideva and a disciple of Amritarasi-pandita, purchased some land from Rattagavunda of Beluvana–grama and granted the same for the worship of Muttina-Keyya Indresvara. Thevillege Beluvana is stated to have belonged to the temple of Ramaiyadeva.
  28. Slab lying in Madarageri  – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 144 – refers to the Kalachuri king Bijjala – dated saka 1088, corresponding 1166 CE – The inscription opens with a brief genealogy and eulogistic account of the Conquests of Bijjala. Then follows the genealogy of the king’s general Sridhara, who Was governing Huligere—300. The purpose of the epigraph is to record  the forming of a brahmapuri  in the Capital town (rajadhani-pattana) of Huligere by Sridhara-dandanayaka and his brother Macharasa-dandanayaka. The brahmapuri was donated to fifty-two persons among whom were a number of brahmanas versed in different branches of learning. The boundaries of the brahmapuri are specified.
  29. Slab in the backyard of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 145 – refers to the Kalachuri king Bijjala – date lost – This damaged  and mutilated inscription begins with the genealogy of the Chalukya dynasty, down to Taila III. Then follows a Description of the valorous deeds of  Bijjala  and the genealogy of his general Ramadeva-dandanatha. The purport of the record cannot be made out.
  30. Slab in the back-yard of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 167 – refers to the Kalachuri king [Sanka]ma – dated in the king’s regnal year 3, corresponding 1179 CE – The inscription records a gift, the details of which are lost, for repairs to the Temple of Svayambhu-Lakshmanesvara of  Huligere.  The gift was entrusted to Trilochana-pandita.
  31. Hero–stone built into the wall of the backyard of the taluk office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 294 – 12th century CE – This undated inscription in Kannada records that people mourned over the death of Kampila and Sidila–Bomma. It refers to Dhavalamka-bhima, perhaps a title of Kampila. In characters of about the 12th century.
  32. Pedestal now bearing a Basava image near the sahasralinga temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 295 – 12th century CE – It record that the image of Vegdeva was installed by Bachiraja. In character of about the 12th century.
  33. Hero–stone set up near the well known as jodu Kappali-bhavi – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 296 – 12th century CE – This fragmentary record mentions Mahamandalesvara Boppadeva, the manneya of Huligere-nadu, Jayakesideva and a son of the latter. In characters of about the 12th century.
  34. Pedestal  of the image of Virabhadra in the Virabhadra temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 315 – 12th- 13th century CE – The record states that Chaundarya had the image of Lakshminarayana installed in money of Mallamba. In characters of about the 12th- 13th century.
  35. Left pillar at the eastern entrance into the Somesvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 331 – 13th century CE – This record characters  of about the 13th century. The inscription record the renovation of the temple of Somanatha by guru Nagesvara who is said to have hailed from Saurashtra. The record is in faulty Sanskrit language.
  36. Slab built into the wall of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 191 – refers to the Yadava king Singhana – not dated, based upon tithi it corresponds to 1215 CE – The inscription records a gift of oil for burning a perpetual lamp in the temple of god [Kedara]deva, by the oil men of Purikaranagara.  It appears that Mayi-pandita was administrating Purikaranagara at the time as a subordinate of the king. The writer of the inscription was a son of Rudrabhattopadhyaya.
  37. Slab built to the wall of the Taluk District – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 198 – refers to the Yadava king Singhana – dated Saka 11[49], corresponding 1227 CE – The inscription records a gift of land and house-site, after purchase from Goggiyacharya (?), by Murujavideva, disciple of Kedaradeva for the srtkarya of the Gods Kedaradeva and Chikkesvaradeva, at Purikara-nagara and for the feeding of The ascetics, when Mallisetti was governing the Karnata-vishaya. It also records a gift, made after purchase form Tikisetti, son of Bharatisetti, by the same Murujavideva to Jnanasoma-pandita, the acharya of the Somanathadeva temple for the Srikarya of god Kedaresvara.
  38. Slab built into the wall in the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 205 – refers to the Yadava king Singhana – dated saka 1169, corresponding 1247 CE – This inscription states that Rajaladevi, the daughter of Mahapradhana Bichiraja, Renovated the Vijaya-Jinalaya at Purikara-nagara and made a gift of land and Money for the same, on the advice of  her teacher rajaguru  Padmasena and with the consent of her father.
  39. Slab built into the wall of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 206 – refers to the Yadava king Singhana – Undated – The inscription records a gift of land, garden, etc., made, after purchase, by Sanagayya, for the benefit of the temple of Remmesvara, constructed by him in the Premises of the temple of Somanatha at Purikara-nagara and named after his grand Preceptor Remmarasa, when Mallisetti was governing Karnata-vishaya. Mallisetti’s Disciple of Remmarasa who was a disciple of Kesava-dandanatha.
  40. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 207 – refers to the Yadava king Singhana – Date lost – This fragmentary and damaged record mentions Arya Mallisetti, a subordinate of the king.
  41. Hero-stone built into the backyard of  the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 217 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Kannara – dated saka 1181, corresponding 1259 CE – The inscription commemorates the death of Khaiya (also called Khaila) and Mayiga who voluntarily lost their lives following the death of their ‘mother ‘ Lakkhile, The wife of Achideva, a servant of Chamunda-Dandesa.
  42. Hero-stone in the Taluk Office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 222 – refers to the Yadava king Ramachanadra – dated in regnal year, based upon tithi the year corresponds to 1287 CE –  The inscription seems to commemorate the death of Damanayaka, a hero who died in a fight with Mummudi Singeya of Kummata.
  43. Slab standing in the backyard of the Taluk office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 224 – refers to the reign of the Yadava king Ramachandra – dated saka 1217, corresponding 1295 CE – The inscription seems to belong to the reign of Ramadeva of  the Yadava dynasty. It registers a gift of land for worship and offerings to god Santhinathadeva, by Somaya And Padmaya who purchased the land for the purpose. It refers to an officer who was Governing Huligere-300 division. The record mentions certain Jain preceptors Of  Mula-samgha, Surastha-gapa and chitrakuta-anvaya.
  44. Pillar near the southern entrance into the Somesvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 366 – dated on paleographic study to 14th century CE, 1392 CE on tithi – The inscription record that Bhairavadeva, son of Kheyideva, who was a servant of Kumara Sivarama Ayya, renovated the southern gate (temkana darata), obviously of the Somesvara temple.
  45. Three sides of a pillar in Sankhabasti in Basti-bana – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 232 – refers to the reign of the Vijayanagara king Devaraya I – dated saka 1334, corresponding 1412 CE – This refers to a dispute between Hemadevacharya of Sankhabasti at Huligere and Sivaramayya, the acharya of Somadeva temple of the same place regarding the land belonging to the respective temples. The dispute was referred to Mahapradhana Naganna-dandanyaka, at whose command purohita Sangamadeva and the learned people of the place studied the document (sasana)of both the parties, and settled it in favour of Hemadevacharya.
  46. Right pillar at the eastern entrance into the Somesvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 380 – dated saka 1354, corresponding 1432 CE – The inscription records a gift of toll-income to the temple of  Somanatha of Purikara-nagara, by Aliya Vitharasa at the instance of Aradhyadeva of Ubhayamarga.
  47. Fragment of a broken slab lying near the Dharmanata’s house near the Somesvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 384 – in characters of 15th century CE – Only the concluding portion of the record is preserved. It seems to record the gift of a picotta. It refers to the boundaries of Lakshameswar written at the instance of Mallika[na]data-vadeya, and to a gift to Limganagauda son of Somanagauda, of Huligere.
  48. Slab built into the wall of Virabhadra temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 390 – dated saka 1435, corresponding 1513 CE – The inscription record a gift in the presence of god Dakshina-Somesvara of flower-garden by Singisetti–arasa of Kadalige to the temple of Marula–Siddesvara, named after the Saiva preceptor Marulasidda who had come to Huligere. The record is damaged towards the end.
  49. Slab built into the wall of the backyard of the taluk office  – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 391 – dated saka 14…, on the basis of tithi it would be 1538 CE – The inscription registers a deed of settlement of dispute between the Jains headed by Samkhanacharya and Hemanacharya of the Sankha-basti and Kalahastideva and Sivaramadeva of the temple of Dakshina-Somesvaradeva regarding the use of certain honours which had been  misappropriated by the Jains for their deity.
  50. Slab built into the wall of the Taluk office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 238 – refers to the Vijayanagara king Sadasivaraya – dated saka 1469, corresponding 1547 CE – The inscription states that at the request of Sudugada Lingesetti, the king exempted the agrahara Huligere from the levy of marriage tax. Sudugada Lingisetti was deputed by the nadagavdas and others of Huligere to request the king for the exemption.
  51. Slab built into the wall in the Taluk office – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 239 – refers to the Vijayanagara king Sadasivaraya – dated saka 1469, corresponding 1547 CE – The inscription records the gifts, by the king, of taxes made to the barbers. Timmoja, Ramgoja and Bhadroja who were brothers. The gift was made at the Request of  Mahamandalesvara Ramaraja, to whom the barbers had made their request. The king is stated to be ruling from Vidyanagari.
  52. Pillar in the northern entrance into the Somesvara temple – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 242 – may be assigned to the reign of the Vijayanagara king Sadasivaraya – undated – This undated epigraph records the remission of marriage-tax in Huligere-nadu, by the king at the instance of Limgisetti.
  53. Stone set up near the Agastya-tritha – South Indian Inscriptions vol XX, no 420 – It record the installation of the image of god Ramachandradeva at Agattipura, by Timmana, son of Chavudada-Rasaya. In late characters.